"WORLD POSTCARD GUIDE"



This guide is to assist collectors and dealers in ascertaining quickly and hopefully accurately a given foreign postcrd's country of origin. Country of origin is usually shown on the postcard's view. See table below to assist you! Generally, an entry on the table may be translated into "Postcard." Other markings on postcards are generally ignored here except when origin is indicated. No reference books or foreign language scholars were consulted as prime sources but, rather the work of persons who rationally had knowledge of language as applied to deltiology. Completeness of this guide cannot be claimed as data remains in a state of flux.
The General vernacular of the country involved is not necessarily the governing feature in postcard publication. In the early part of this century, the vernacular of the region's tourist trade, or the attempt to serve the tourist-customer, predominated. Now with changes in national outlook and resultant change in postcard publication habits, there may be found changes in what language "postcard" is used on a country's postcard. Frequently, even on the old foreign cards, "postcard" in any language was not found on many cards. Today, this is almost a trend, especially on the continental-size cards for some reason. About this reason, we could philosophize and delve into the psychology of postcard publication, but not here! Even in the United States, "Post Card" is found less frequently on Continental-size cards. In the United States, we recognize a postcard as it usually has "Post Card" printed on it. When English is thus used on a foreign postcard, frequently the caption is also in English, simpifying the placement process.
It is hoped that this guide will often lead to the proper country of origin. Postcards have been published in one country with a scene from another country. What country should the card be placed?. In honesty however, publisher markings frequently give the publishers home base which is usually in the country of origin. Another clue could be postal markings; these include both the stamp and cancellation. Since travelers like to give their friends a taste of places visited, cards are usually posted in country of origin.
In the table, a modified atlas ordering of countries is used. The rationale here is to order cards according to collection density; that is most general collections will be found with a high density of United States cards, then neighboring countries, etc. To make a brief list briefer, generalizations will be made, crossing international lines.
Editor's Note: Source of this information is unknown at this time and has been edited.
Further assistance with this guide is invited.

T-A-B-L-E



CANADA Post CardIn contrast with the United Kingdom,
Postage is in cents and the term,
"Inland," is not used. Many Variations.
MEXICO Tarjeta Postal
CENTRAL AMERICA,
WEST INDIES





except - Martinique,
Guadeloupe
(French Speaking) =
Post card






Carte Postale
Guatamala, Bordering Mexico,
refrains in cards surveyed in usung "Postcard"
in any language. Costa Rica Panama and Cuba used "Tarjeta Postal" occasionally.
BRAZIL Bilheta PostalPortugese-speaking,
Local dialect "Cartao Postal" is also seen.
SOUTH
AMERICA
Tarjeta Postale,
Post Card
GUIANAS Post Card,
Carte Postale
UNITED STATES Post Card,
Minor exceptions do exist
IRELAND Post CardUsually with refereence to "Inland Postage"
and postage given in pennys (d's).
NORWAY Brevkort Frequently, not in any lanquage.
SWEDEN Brefkort,
Brevkort
FINLAND
(Suomi)
-
Country's name given in
approximate equivalent,
frequently found on postcards.
Postikortti,
Carte Postale
DENMARK Brevkort,
Carte Postale-
French tourist Trade
ICELAND Brjefspjald
GERMANY,
Liechtenstein-Difficult to
distinquish from Germany
Postkarte Frequently, not in any
language
NETHERLANDS Briefkaart
BELGIUM,
Luxenbourg
Carte PostaleTo distinquish Belgium or Luxonbourg from France, Familiarity with local geographic name is helpful.
Commonly found on postcards are: Anvers(Antwerp),
Bruxelles, (Brussels) and Gand (Ghent).
FRANCE,
Manaco-
Scenes of Manaco usually refer to Monte Carlo
Carte Postale
SPAIN Tarjeta Postal
PORTUGAL,
Azores
Bilheta Postal
ITALY Cartolina Postal
SWITZERLAND,
(Suisse)-Country's name is given in approximately equivalent,
frequently found on postcards.
Carte Postale,
Postkarte,
Carolina Postal-
Depends on regional language.
Austria
Difficult to distinquish
from Germany by this test
Postkarte-
Frequently not in any language.
Correspondenzkarte-
Some form of Korrespndez Karte used
on many pioneer cards.
CZECHOSLAVAKIA,
Some form of Korrespondez Karte used
on many pioneer cards.
Dopisnica used more frequently on Estonia.
Levelezo-Lap,
Dopisnice
POLAND
(Polska)
No Indication
MALTA
Gibralter
Post Card
RUSSIA In Russian Characters
GREECE In Grrek characters
TURKEY Carte Postale,
Postkarte
ISREAL Carte Postale,
Post Card,
also Hebrew
characters
INDIA Post Card,
Carte Postale
No reference to "Inland Postage."
Postage given as United Kingdom.
CEYLON Post CardNo reference to "Inland Postage."
Postage given as United Kingdom.
NEPAL
(Sikkum)
Post Card
SIAM In Native Characters
CHINA Carte Poste,
also in
native Characters
CAMBODIA Post card
BURMA Post Card
MALAYA,
Malaysia,
Mandalay
Post Card
JAVA Carte Postale
PHILLIPINE ISLANDS Carte Postale
TAHITI Carte Postale
KOREA,
(Chosen)
In Native characters
AUSTRALIA Post Card
NEW ZEALAND Post Card
FIJI Post Card
JAPAN Post card,
Carte Postale
MOROCCO,
Algiers,
Tunis
Carte Postale,
North African scenes usually include natives
or palm trees in distinction from French Scenes
EGYPT Post card,
Carte Postale
South
AFRICA
Post Card,
Poskaart

NOTES:

1. As mnemonic in making the table part of the postcard buff's always present equipment, let us consider etymology of the terms found there and how they relate to English words.
Of course, terms, as 'carte.' 'kort,' 'karte,' are related to our 'card;' 'postal' and 'postale,' to our 'post' and are responsible for our confusion over 'postal card' and 'postcard.'
'Bilhete' and our 'bill'(as in "bill of fare") are related. 'Cartolina' and 'tarjata' may be considered as diminutives to give us 'little card.' The various forms of 'brev' and 'bref' are related to our 'brief' (meaning "letter") as in "brief case."
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